Personal essay high school examples

examples school high personal essay. Thus: all verbs expressing emotion may have an intensive termination suffixed, imparting to them additional force; again, certain prefixes indicating civility, respect and affection may be employed in the imperative and optative moods; again, a higher synthetic construction may be employed in the sentence, by which the idea expressed is emphasized, a device in constant use in their poetry; and especially the strength of emotion is indicated by suffixing a series of terminations expressing contempt, reverence or love. We only know that they are not. I am half afraid to look into Tom Jones, lest it should not answer my expectations at this time of day; and if it did not, I should certainly be disposed to fling it into the fire, and never look into another novel while I lived. What so great happiness as to be beloved, and to know that we deserve to be beloved? Hence, probably, the fact noted by historians of medi?val manners that the coarseness of the jocosity appeared to increase with the magnitude of the feast. Such a one is indeed the pattern of a friend, another self—and our gratitude for the blessing is as sincere, as it is hollow in most other cases! It is vain to attempt to persuade the Indian that such notions are false and cannot be facts. Feeling in itself a continued consciousness of it’s past impressions, it is naturally disposed to transfer the same sort of identity and consciousness to the whole of it’s being, as if whatever is said generally to belong to _itself_ must be inseparable from it’s very existence. These described and exaggerated by the lively and humorous, though coarse and rustic eloquence of Dr. It was not only the language, but the time. The new appearance of her grandfather after an absence excited her laughter on the 133rd day. In assignment of members of the staff to grades, existing conditions were recognized as far as possible, with no immediate attempt to remedy faults that might exist therein. But the true mystic is not satisfied merely by feeling, he must pretend at least that he _sees_, and the absorption into the divine is only the necessary, if paradoxical, limit of this contemplation. Indeed, it seems likely that an element of this joyous rebound from a half-developed state of fear entered into much of this child’s laughter, already illustrated, on succeeding in a rather risky experiment, such as climbing the staircase. To treat them in any respect as men, to reason and dispute with them upon ordinary occasions, requires such resolution, that there are few men whose magnanimity can support them in it, unless they are likewise assisted by similarity and acquaintance. “Because in boiling water the guilty are scalded and the innocent are unhurt, because Lot escaped unharmed from the fire of Sodom, and the future fire which will precede the terrible Judge will be harmless to the Saints, and will burn the wicked as in the Babylonian furnace of old.”[890] In the Life of St. It is a single rhyme, and the verse consists of no more than ten syllables: but as the last syllable is not accented, it is an imperfect rhyme, which, however, when confined to the second verse of the couplet, and even there introduced but rarely, may have a very agreeable grace, and the line may even seem to run more easy and natural by means of it: But of this frame, the bearings, and the ties. 3.—An example, which indeed every one is, more or 118 less, of the correspondence, as far as the remnants of mind exist, between his present and original character and organization. By an accident of this kind he may be said to lose his all, notwithstanding his integrity and justice; in the same manner as a cautious man, notwithstanding his utmost circumspection, may be ruined by an earthquake or an inundation. Of course, it may get headed in some other direction. Later on, with the growth of a bolder spirit, this laughing triumph over fear extended itself, so that in the twenty-ninth month she played at bear with her uncle, going into a dark room, with her hand in her aunt’s, and enjoying “the exhilaration of unreal alarm”; and when the uncle sprang out from his dark hiding-place, growling fearfully, she “laughed, shrieked and fled all in one”. 21.—Was formerly in states of furious revenge, now 169 gradually diminished in frequency and degree, by kindness Observation 9th.—A happy illustration of the effects of 170 kindness Case No. This is only one instance of the fact, which I believe to be a fact, that there is almost no kind of advertising that cannot be done in a live, modern public library, if one only goes the right way about it. He, however, kept close to the coast for fear of losing his way, and saw for the most part only the inferior fishing tribes. When the body was free from pain and the mind from fear and anxiety, the superadded sensation of bodily pleasure could be of very little importance; and though it might diversify, could not properly be said to increase the happiness of this situation. There are others, that though they allow the Story yet affirm, that the propagation, and continuance of Mankind, was the only Reason for which we were made; as if the Wisdom that first made Man, cou’d not without trouble have continu’d the Species by the same or any other Method, had not this been most conducive to his happiness, which was the gracious and only end of his Creation. Since, moreover, the humorous person has trained himself in the swift detection of the accompaniments and the relations of the objects which he inspects, and has a habit of looking at the neglected sides of things, it may be expected that he will be found now and again among those who in the troubled {339} atmosphere preserve something of the faculty of clear observation. This combination of telephone and parcel post seems to me the ideal of library service when you can name the book you want and don’t care to be merely browsing along the shelves. The special interests of the community will guide those efforts, and here too the library of one town will differ materially from that of another. As for the rest, there are merely various degrees of intelligence. We find tongues in which the primary sounds are themselves significant, and yet at the same time are highly variable; and we find many examples in which they are inadequate to convey the sense of the articulate sound. We never are generous except when in some respect we prefer some other person to ourselves, and sacrifice some great and important interest of our own to an equal interest of a friend or of a superior. Disier_, consisting of 314 decisions of doubtful cases referred by the magistrates of St. The line between them may be drawn in different places by different people. He is a surgeon, and was formerly in great repute as a successful practitioner, as well as a lecturer on anatomy, surgery, and the practice of physic. They cannot therefore suggest, at least in the same manner as the objects of Touch, their externality and independency of existence. They assigned, therefore, to {343} each of them, a sphere of its own; that is, supposed each of them to be attached to the concave side of a solid and transparent body, by whose revolutions they were carried round the earth. It personal essay high school examples is for a reason of the same kind, that a certain reserve is necessary when we talk of our own friends, our own studies, our own professions. Before leaving comedy, we may glance at other forms of literature which seem to approach its point of view. To show much anxiety about praise, even for praise-worthy actions, is seldom a mark of great wisdom, but generally of some degree of weakness. He will mumble over a tune very correctly, {121a} but has seldom any words. It may sometimes happen, that with the most serious and earnest desire of acting so as to deserve approbation, we may mistake the proper rules of conduct, and thus be misled by that very principle which ought to direct us. That the objects of Sight are not perceived as resisting or pressing upon the organ which perceives them, is sufficiently obvious. In speaking, less is required of you, if you only do it at once, with grace and spirit: in writing, you stipulate for all that you are capable of, but you have the choice of your own time and subject. There may be equal elegance, but not the same ease; there may be even greater intelligence, but without the innocence; more vivacity, but then it will run into petulance or coquetry; in short, there may be every other good quality but a total absence of all pretension to or wish to make a display of it, but the same unaffected modesty and simplicity. We are on the watch to see how time goes; and it appears to lag behind, because, in the absence of objects to arrest our immediate attention, we are always getting on before it. A bigoted Roman Catholic, who, during the massacre of personal essay high school examples St. This wide association of ideas may be taken to mean that happiness was regarded by our forefathers as always the sport of chance; but I prefer to regard it as an evidence that a life in which everything is for the best–where no mistakes are made and where all is fair sailing and successful outcome, is dependent on some fundamental cause. It was, in the same manner, that the motion originally impressed by the Creator upon the infinitude of matter, necessarily produced in personal essay high school examples it an infinity of greater and smaller vortices, or circular streams: and the law of motion being so adjusted as always to preserve the same quantity of motion in the universe, those vortices either continued for ever, or by their dissolution gave birth to others of the same kind. Their benefits can extend but to a few; but their fortunes interest almost every body. He confines himself, as much as his duty will permit, to his own affairs, and has no taste for that foolish importance which many people wish to derive from appearing to have some influence in the management of those of other people. John C. The broad farcical lines of Moliere may seem to be the same drawing as Jonson’s. Paul’s Church-Yard. The corpse was exposed to the open air for some hours, with breast and stomach bare to insure the thorough coagulation of the blood. This is essentially a teacher’s view. Through the interest of an elder brother, he expected to obtain a most lucrative and respectable situation in the East Indies, but it was discovered on his examination that he did not possess the requisite qualifications, consequently, he was not merely disappointed, but his pride was doubly mortified by being reduced to the necessity of undertaking the management of a common farm; there, with several other causes, these things operating on a spirit ill prepared for any adverse wind or the common storms of life, soured his temper; and at last produced so exasperated and violent a state of mind, that his mother, sisters, and friends, were compelled on account of various outrageous acts of passion to confine him. And in this case, too, we cannot allow the term to cover all bad writing. If the man was vanquished, he was beheaded; if the woman, she only lost a hand, for the reason that the chances of the fight were against her.[462] In Bohemia, also, women over the age of eighteen had the privilege of the duel; the man was put into a pit as deep as his waist; the woman was armed with sword and buckler, but was not allowed to approach nearer than a circle traced around the mouth of the pit.[463] The liability of ecclesiastics to the duel varied with the varying relations between the church and state. Is not this strange, unaccountable? The bishop summoned the offender, who stoutly denied the allegation, until a vessel of cold water was brought and a stone thrown in, when the bishop blessed the water, and ordered the father to take out the stone, saying that the result would show the truth or falsity of his asseverations. The greater part of men, therefore, cannot find any great difficulty in elevating themselves to all the joy which any accession to this situation can well excite in their companion. Justice, on the contrary, is the main pillar that upholds the whole edifice. It remains to account for the persistent fit of laughter which frequently accompanies a prolonged gladness. Furthermore, there are verbal parallels so close to the _Spanish Tragedy_ as to leave no doubt that in places Shakespeare was merely _revising_ the text of Kyd. It _may_ apply also, as has been hinted above, to the effect of the obscene; though I, at least, feel that without some forcing the effect cannot be interpreted in this way. Let it be to me this day a test of my innocence, and may the Omnipotent God this day by his judgment absolve me of the accusations if I am innocent, or let me perish by sudden death if guilty!” Swallowing the wafer, he turned to the emperor, and demanded of him the same refutation of the charges urged against him by the German princes. We are little shocked at these gross contradictions; for if the mind was capable of perceiving them in all their absurdity, it would not be liable to fall into them. So, after ‘all that’s come and gone yet,’—after the anxious doubts and misgivings of his mind as to his own destiny—after all the pains he took to form himself in solitude and obscurity—after the slow dawn of his faculties, and their final explosion, that like an eruption of another Vesuvius, dazzling all men with its light, and leaving the burning lava behind it, shook public opinion, and overturned a kingdom—after having been ‘the gaze and shew of the time’—after having been read by all classes, criticised, condemned, admired in every corner of Europe—after bequeathing a name that at the end of half a century is never repeated but with emotion as another name for genius and misfortune—after having given us an interest in his feelings as in our own, and drawn the veil of lofty imagination or of pensive regret over all that relates to his own being, so that we go a pilgrimage to the places where he lived, and recall the names he loved with tender affection (worshipping at the shrines where his fires were first kindled, and where the purple light of love still lingers—‘Elysian beauty, melancholy grace!’)—after all this, and more, instead of taking the opinion which one half of the world have formed of Rousseau with eager emulation, and the other have been forced to admit in spite of themselves, we are to be sent back by Mr. He had as much truth and character, but none of the polished graces or transparent softness of Chantry. The Lenox Library in New York, now part of the Public Library, was almost entirely a book-museum and was so intended by its founder. But if Mr.